May 2016 Wrap-Up

I didn’t thing my having read two books in April justified a wrap-up, especially since both were re-reads (City of Bones & City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare), so I am now back with my May wrap-up. May was an awesome reading month – I’ve finally finished re-reading the first three Mortal Instruments books, and started reading the other ones, which I have never actually came around to picking up. I also started Shades of Magic series (?), since they’ve been sitting on my shelf for ages, and all is well in the reading world.

One with You (Crossfire #5) by Sylvia Day 3/5

Crossfire series started off very hot and dark and intriguing, and went downhill with every book. Although I enjoyed One with You a little bit more than the previous two books, both of which I rated 2/5, this was not the conclusion I was hoping for. A couple of plot points that were introduced in this last instalment were never mentioned or hinted to before and made absolutely no sense to me, which I found to be very annoying, because I feel like it is just lazy writing in order to reach a certain page quantity. Also, so many things were left unresolved, and I really don’t care for it. As much as I grew attached to Eva and Gideon, I am glad their story is over (though it should’ve been over two books ago, don’t you think?).

City of Glass (The Mortal Instruments #3) by Cassandra Clare 4/5

I didn’t think I would ever re-read these books and continue on with the series, but Shadowhunters TV show changed my mind. I didn’t want to pick up where I’ve left off and start reading the fourth book, since I’ve read the first three years ago and didn’t remember much, so I picked them all up once again. I was very surprised, because I enjoyed them much more than the first time around! This time I decided not to dwell on continuous teen angst and tedious tropes, and noticed that the writing is actually quite humorous and lively, and that the plot is very action-packed and politically-driven, which is my favorite kind.

A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic #1) by V.E. Schwab 3/5

I liked A Darker Shade of Magic a lot! Though the start of the story was very slow and confusing, the pace did pick up in the second half, and I could barely put the book down. I’ve never read anything by V.E. Schwab before, and I find that she is a really great storyteller. Slow and confusing is perfectly understandable when you have to introduce the reader to four different Londons and a complicated magic system. I feel that it is a strong beginning to a potentially very interesting and intriguing series.

A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1) by Sarah J. Maas 4/5

I wanted to refresh my memory before picking up A Court of Mist and Fury, so I also re-read ACOTAR in May. And although it’s only been a few months since I’ve read ACOTAR the first time, there were a lot of things I didn’t remember and some things I didn’t catch before. I thought I liked Feyre before, but this time she annoyed the hell out of me, though she did redeem herself in my eyes when she started to make smarter decisions, which I appreciate.

A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic #2) by V.E. Schwab 4/5

I loved to get to know more about elemental magic, and I loved seeing characters going their separate ways. The plot of A Gathering of Shadows was mostly focused on a magic tournament whose goal is to basically reassert the power of rulers. And as per usual, the most interesting things are going on behind the scenes. I also enjoyed little flashbacks to events that happened in the four months since our main characters saw each other last. I loved that Lila has become a real, not self-proclaimed, pirate. The ending was heartbreaking and made me feel for Kell so much! And I can’t wait to read the next one!

City of Fallen Angels (The Mortal Instruments #4) by Cassandra Clare 4/5

City of Fallen Angels kind of felt like the first book in a new series, which was actually kind of nice. New plot points, new struggles, new stories, new big bads! This series is ridiculously action-packed, and it is getting harder and harder to put these books down.

 

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March 2016 Wrap-Up

I have finished 6 books in the month of March, three of which – in the last week of March. That was The Winner’s Trilogy by Marie Rutkoski, which I simply devoured. I have not been this invested in a book, especially YA one, since forever. Now I wish I could unread it, so I could read it once again with fresh eyes.

Tatiana and Alexander by Paullina Simons 4/5

I feel like The Bronze Horseman trilogy gets better with every book. I enjoyed Tatiana and Alexander a lot. I loved the flashbacks to Alexander’s childhood; Alexander as a child was hilarious, clever, and full of irony and snark. I also loved seeing how Tatiana builds a life for herself and her son in New York, her struggle of starting over. The historical aspects of this book are beautifully written and incredibly interesting.

The Summer Garden by Paullina Simons 4/5

The Summer Garden is my favorite book in the trilogy due to it being the most character-driven of the three, dealing with the postwar ordeals and struggles, a distance that grows between people who have been through too much, starting a whole new life, and learning to live it.

Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard 3/5

I did not enjoy Glass Sword as much as the first book. I think my rating is closer to 2.5-2.75. The first half of the book was outright boring, though the pace did pick up later on. Nothing about this book is particularly good and compelling, and all in all, I was disappointed with the sequel. However, I do think I will continue on with the series, because I did like the first book, so I will wait to make up my mind about the direction the story is taking after the next one.

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski 5/5

I. Can’t. Even. I did not expect to like The Winner’s Curse as much as I did, especially because I have not liked most YA fantasy books I have read lately. But this surprised me. It was politically-driven, intriguing, and unputdownable. I loved the characters, because they did not have the usual YA traits that I hate. They are clever, passionate, kind and humane. The affection Kestrel and Arin felt for each other is the most beautiful thing I have ever read about (except Outlander, because nothing can compare to Claire and Jamie’s relationship, though Kestrel and Arin come close) – no insta-love, no unnecessary angst. Just a wonderful, slow-burning thing that you cannot help but root for.

The Winner’s Crime by Marie Rutkoski 5/5

The Winner’s Crime was excruciating in the best possible way. I love schemes and political games, and Marie Rutkoski did them justice. YA books usually have THE WORST miscommunication tropes that make absolutely no sense. The Winner’s Crime succeeded in incorporating miscommunication, lies and secrets in a way that not only made perfect sense, but could not have been done any other way. My heart broke into million pieces and I loved every second of it.

The Winner’s Kiss by Marie Rutkoski 5/5

When I received my copy of The Winner’s Kiss, the first thing I did is check how long it was. Oh, so long, 484 pages, yay! And still I read it in one sitting… It’s just that good. The key players play the political game like nobody’s business – they are cunning, intelligent and clever, and always have something hidden up their sleeve. Court intrigues, lies, half-truths, plots and schemes make for a very exciting story, while the romance between the main characters waters down the negative, it being packed with warmth and gentleness, genuine care for each other, beautiful and intimate friendship, ability to read the other person like you’ve known them your whole life, attempts to save each other from hurt and pain by putting aside your own happiness, honor and morale.

Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Georgie McCool is a TV writer looking for her big break. So when the opportunity knocks, she does not think twice about it, even though it might mean ruining her marriage. Two days before she and her husband Neal are supposed to visit Neal’s parents for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she cannot go. Neal takes the kids and goes without her and Georgie wonders if this is the thing that will finally irreversibly ruin her relationship with her husband. Neal does not take her calls; but Georgie soon discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past.

Rating: 5/5

Landline is a very entertaining, romantic, light-hearted story full of amusing, playful dialogues, vivid flashbacks and whimsical characters. As Georgie communicates with the Past Neal, she remembers the little things that were forgotten over the years. She remembers why she fell in love with him. She remembers their time together and starts to feel that she made the wrong decision not going on holiday with her family, putting her work first.

I take for granted that you’ll be there when I’m done doing whatever it is I’m doing. I take for granted that you’ll love me no matter what.

Even though the book deals with Past and Present selves of the characters, it is in no way a book about time travel. The means of communicating to the past – the magic phone – is never explained. It is just a means to nudge Georgie in the right direction, making her stop taking her family for granted and try to care less about her career. And by the end of the story you are left with a very real feeling that things do happen for a reason!

It is a great book for Christmas time. It is also great for people who might be struggling with their own relationships, because it puts things in perspective.

Nobody’s lives just fit together. Fitting together is something you work at. It’s something you make happen – because you love each other.

Wasn’t that the point of life? To find someone to share it with?
And if you got that part right, how far wrong could you go? If you were standing next to the person you loved more than everything else, wasn’t everything else just scenery?